Week 10 of the BWBB


bike-logoI am getting better, but I keep stressing to my students and others, that this is 10 weeks of practice. I am still getting about 5-10 minutes of practice twice
a day. I did take it to our state teachers’ conference and it was interesting in who took interest. It was generally the younger teachers (and student helpers) and the very experienced teachers. It seemed like the younger teachers were convinced they could ride it and very experienced teachers were interested in the mental part of it.

Week 10 VideoMuch smoother and can go around corners. Still requires a lot of concentration.

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Week 8 of the BWBB

I do not have a video for the 8th week.  It would pretty bike-logomuch look like week 6, except I can now go a bit farther. On Thursday I was able to make one and a half laps around the math wing without putting my feet down. That would be about 500 feet with 6 corners. After one and a half laps I noticed a centipede on the floor and completely lost my concentration. It is the little things that distract me and then my mind reverts back to what it has done for the last 50 years (turn into the fall). Many people still don’t realize that it is not learning to turn correctly that is the challenge, but unlearning what my mind has been doing for a long time. To actually turn a corner was not a big challenge for me, as much as the panic and losing concentration as it was happening.

I am still riding it 2-3 times per day and try to go two laps around the math wing. After two laps my mind seems really taxed and it is hard to concentrate any longer. When I have tried a third lap, it was a disaster. Later in the day I can try again with some success.

How does that relate to students that really have to struggle with math? With 60 minute periods a struggling student must really need stamina to make it to the end of class. This has reminded me to change up activities more often during the class period. I have always noticed that when we do an activity too long, students get off task. I assumed that it was because they were bored, but maybe the struggling students can no longer concentrate on that concept.

Learning is hard!

BWBB Week 6

bike-logoAfter six weeks of learning how to ride a Backwards Brain Bicycle, I am able to go about 100 feet without putting my feet down to catch myself. It is not pretty and definitely not smooth. I have decided my definition of being successful riding the bike, would be to ride it without “thinking” about steering for balance. At this point I am definitely having to think hard about turning into the fall, “in the opposite direction”. I want my brain to take over the balancing. I am having to really concentrate to steer to balance. If I get distracted, I revert back to what I have done on a bike for the past 50 years, and need to catch myself with my feet.

I am going a bit faster, which helps with the balance. As I go faster I feel strange not wearing a helmet, so I am going to start wearing a helmet. I don’t want to send the wrong message about safety.

One of my goals of this project is to actively study the learning process. I don’t know if this is the same thing, but my observation of other people is much more intriguing. Many students are convinced that it is going to be easy to ride the bike before they try. Some try a very short amount of time and want to walk way. Some try for a longer time and before they leave they promise to come back. I teach Algebra 1 to 9th grade students and Honors Algebra 2 to 9th-11th grade students. Interestly, lots of Algebra 1 students have tried and continue to try to ride the bike. Very few Honors Algebra 2 have tried to ride the bike. At this point, I am of the belief that people that are not used to failing don’t want to try things that their chance of success is low. Most of the Honors Algebra 2 students are also much more reserved and don’t want to “look bad” in front of their peers. I do not want to generalize this situation too much, but I do see huge differences in how the high academic achievers react differently than other students. Along the same lines, the Algebra 1 students that don’t give up in class, are more likely to try riding the bike (and try other things).

I would like more teachers to ride the bike and will make that one of my goals. I am taking my bike to our state teacher conference in three weeks and will courage people to try it. It is not on the agenda anywhere, but we have a great group of math teachers in Montana and I am sure it will get lots of interest.

 

Week 6 Video – I am getting better, but it really takes concentration and it doesn’t look smooth, yet.